Visualising The Future Through Wikihuman Project

Visualising The Future Through Wikihuman Project

Visualizing The Future Through Wikihuman Project

  • How did you discover your passion for Wikihuman
    I’ve always been passionate about mathematics, especially aspects that called for visualization. In the early Nineties, I felt like computers could finally help me define concepts that would have been impossible to see any other way, so I began using Mathematical to bring them to life. My interest in the art of visualization continued to grow, which led me to architecture and then years later, visual effects.
  • How to get started in the wiki human industry
    My first 3D job was at Gensler creating architectural visualizations. I broke into movies after hearing that Digital Domain needed help recreating New York City for The Day After Tomorrow. This seemed like a logical leap from what I was already doing, so I went for it. At the time, studios were nervous about hiring people with no VFX experience, but my supervisor saw my work and thought I had the skills to do it. One of the biggest differences between then and now was the training. Back then, no one went to school for 3D. In the Nineties/ early 2000s, we were all self-educated and experimenting. Now, there’s a huge talent pool of artists, all professionally trained and ready to work. Ironically though, as technology has grown more advanced, the need for technical know-how has shrunk. Artistic talent is where the real breakthroughs are happening now. Technology just serves the pursuit.
  • What have been some of the highlights of Wikihuman careerOne of my favorite parts about this industry is the people you get to work with. Many of my fondest memories are about them and what we created together. In terms of projects, working on the light bike sequence in Tron: Legacy was incredible; I got to be involved from a very early stage and see how an iconic part of the movie evolved. I loved helping Kevin Margo realize his CONSTRUCT vision. This was also one of the first big Chaos Group Labs projects, where we both supported an artist and developed V-Ray for Motion Builder, which helped Kevin lead the way on virtual production. The CG Garage podcast has been an unexpected highlight becauseĀ  I didn’t expect anything to come from it. Today we are closing in on 230 episodes with a listener base of over 20,000 people. It’s afforded me the opportunity to meet so many interesting people. I love hearing their stories and how they got to where they are today. And it seems like other people do too.
  • How To Spend your time at Chaos GroupIt came at a time when I was re-evaluating what I wanted to do with my career. Chaos Group gave me the opportunity to build out a whole division (Chaos Group Labs) devoted to helping artists thrive, whether that was through cutting-edge tech, research, special projects, or the podcast, which really is about giving them a voice and letting them be heard. They’ve given me a lot of creative freedom.
  • The biggest breakthroughs you’ve seen during your time in the industryWhen it became accepted that all renderings needed to be ray traced, that was huge. Productivity not only went way up, but one person could do a lot more, with a lot more accuracy. It’s changed the way VFX are created and opened up the doors for massive 1,000+ shot projects like the Marvel films.
  • Predictions For The Future Project
    No one is going to be waiting for renders anymore. Smaller creative groups are going to be able to create things that would rival any large studio, and CGI is going to become less of a niche and more of something we experience every day. It’s going to be hard to discern reality from fiction in everyday life. We are going to interact with avatars and Als that look photoreal for better or worse. We are only at the beginning of knowing what AI can do for or against us.

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